Brian Pebley & Lunsford— Sale of Unregistered Promissory Notes

Ponzi scheme attorneysBrian Pebley and Lawrence Lunsford Allegedly Solicited Over $2.1 Million from about 43 Investors by Purportedly Claiming to Offer an Opportunity in a “Low-risk” Start-up Pro Golf Tour Sponsored by the Late Arnold Palmer

Brian Pebley and Lawrence Lunsford allegedly solicited over $2.1 million from approximately 43 investors in a so-called “low-risk” start-up pro golf tour sponsored by the late Arnold Palmer, according to Civil Complaint filed last month by the Colorado Division of Securities currently under review by attorneys Alan Rosca and James Booker.

The aforementioned Complaint further alleges that said 43 investors were purportedly promised enormous returns on unregistered promissory notes.

Brian Pebley and Lawrence Lunsford allegedly operated their golf scheme through northern Colorado based C.H.A.M.P. Financial Group and Fort Collins-based National Professional Golf Tour, operated in El Paso, Texas by Lunsford, the Complaint also reports.

Brian Pebley and Lawrence Lunsford allegedly made reports to potential investors that their cash would reap 10 to 15 percent returns, the Complaint notes.

The aforementioned alleged potential returns would also be accompanied by a quarterly dividend and royalty payments, according to the Complaint.

The Peiffer Rosca Wolf securities lawyers are investigating Brian Pebley and Lawrence Lunsford’s alleged sale of unregistered promissory notes.

Many of the So-called Victims were Senior Citizens and Held Knowledge of Pebley from His Work through Church and Primerica Financial

Brian Pebley allegedly came to know many of his alleged victims from his work at Primerica Financial, a company which sold life insurance and other investment products, according to Civil Complaint filed last month by the Colorado Division of Securities presently being reviewed by attorneys Alan Rosca and James Booker.

Many of the aforementioned victims were also elderly and also knew many of his clients from church functions, the Complaint also notes.

The Complaint further gives on example of one so-called victim that allegedly made an investment of $145,000 and took in a promise that they would received a 20 percent return whilst another investor chipped in $150,000 and was allegedly promised a 10 percent return within half a year.

The victim-investors purportedly took solace that Brian Pebley and Lawrence Lunsford allegedly assured them that the investment was very low risk because the tour was purportedly “sponsored” by the legendary Palmer, the Complaint notes.

C.H.A.M.P was also allegedly not registered as a broker-dealer firm and Pebley also allegedly operated as an unlicensed sales representative, the Complaint states.

The Complaint is purportedly looking for injunctive relief and restitution on behalf of the 43 known investors.

Securities Lawyers Investigating

The Peiffer Rosca Wolf securities lawyers often represent investors who lose money as a result of fraud schemes and are currently investigating Brian Pebley and Lawrence Lunsford’s alleged sale of unregistered promissory notes. They take most cases of this type on a contingency fee basis and advance the case costs, and only get paid for their fees and costs out of money they recover for their clients.

Investors who believe they lost money as a result of Brian Pebley and Lawrence Lunsford’s alleged sale of unregistered promissory notes may contact the securities lawyers at Peiffer Rosca Wolf, Alan Rosca or James Booker, for a free no-obligation evaluation of their recovery options, at 888-998-0520 or via e-mail at arosca@prwlegal.com or jbooker@prwlegal.com.

Alan Rosca (1225 Posts)

Alan is a securities lawyer. He also teaches Securities Regulation at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. He focuses his legal practice on complex commercial and financial litigation and arbitration, particularly in the areas of securities and investment fraud. His office is in Cleveland, Ohio.


In our legal system, every person is innocent until and unless found guilty by a court of law or a tribunal. Whenever we reference “allegations” or charges that are “alleged,” such allegations or charges have not been proven, and are merely accusations, not findings of fault, as of the date of the blog. We do not have, nor do we undertake, a duty to continue to monitor or follow cases about which we report, and/or to publish subsequent blogs regarding various developments that may occur in such cases. Readers are encouraged to conduct their own research regarding any such cases and any developments that may or may not have occurred in such cases.